Technical backstage: D’Anca minipassive EQ

It’s not a didactic section (when needed I’ll link related pages on manufacturer site) but so as to explain my approach to recording.


After my analog consolle D&R Dayner I want speak about a fine piece of gear, which you found a couple into my control room: D’Anca minipassive equalizer.

D'Anca minipassive EQ

D’Anca minipassive EQ

Michele D’Anca laboratory is in Milan and his products are handmade with great quality and attention.

Minipassive is a passive EQ like EQP-1 Pultec program equalizer with some added frequencies.

EQP-1 is originally made in 1951 by Ollie Summerland and Gene Shank (*) and it works with solid state electronics (EQ section) and three tubes (one to AC rectifier and two to amp section)(**).

The first time which I tried passive EQ it was the Waves PuigTec EQP-1A plug-in and I loved it because it adds a depth and tridimensional sound on my ITB mixes.

I like D’Anca minipassive much more than any similar plug-in because it adds more warmth and solid sound to instruments.

Generally I use it on drums stereo group to add a solid low frequency and a breezy high end and kick, snare and cymbals are grateful. Others tracks like bass, guitars and vocals have a good time with it.

I tested my D’Anca minipassive EQ with SpectraFoo Complete, to display how it operate.

Cheers,

Lorenzo

(*) history by Universal Audio website

(**) Pultec EQP-1 electronic


Disclaimer: I tested this gear with care, nevertheless this test is inevitably affected by my opinion and possible analyzer gear and software imprecisions.


Copyright © 2013-2014 by iuatwest. All rights Reserved.
This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://iuatwest.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Technical backstage: Mid-Side and other stereo techniques

Today I started a little column where I brought into focus technicals stuff.

I’ll write short review about equipment in my studio and some tracking techniques that I use and why.

It’s not a didactic section (when needed I’ll link related pages on manufacturer site) but so as to explain my approach to recording.

I’ll post this column once a week (probabily sunday).


Mid-Side technique

It’s a stereo tracking technique by Alain Blumlein based on a coincident array of two microphone, one directional (typical cardioid) in front of the audio source (orchestral ensemble or musical instrument) and one bidirectional (or eight figure) turned by 90 degrees. DPA microphone about polar patterns.

Signals by Mid (cardioid) and Side (eight figure) using a matrix to achieve Left (M+S) and Right (M-S) channels (stereo signal).

L = Mid + Side and R = Mid- Side

It’s possible switch any stereo signal into a Mid-Side couple with another matrix where Left/Right are summed into Mid (L+R) and subtract into Side (L-R). This is a fine technique used, for example, in mixing and mastering to adjust center component like vocal or electric bass (you have to think on a stereo signal builded with three components: Left/Center/Right) and to broadcast stereo signal on FM modulation, where Mid (L+R) is a mono signal and Side (L-R) is component to rebuild the original L/R signal.

A particulary development of Mid-Side technique is double MS technique to make a surround recording (5.1).  Shoeps on double MS technique – pdf  (very interesting paper)


Why I like it

I like this technique for his nice and wide stereo front, mono compatibility (when stereo signal is collapsed Side dissapear) and fundamental possibility to encoding comeback (to rebuild original Mid-Side signals).

It’s important to highlight the front position of the cardioid microphone (Mid) because it’s the best way to shot center audio source. Unlike ORTF and XY where the microphones are angled and the recording may be less accurate for the off-axys coloration.

Since 1997 I realized M-S technique with several microphone: Rode NT-2 (cardioid) coupled with AKG C414 ULS (eight figure), with two matched AKG C414 TL-II and actually with a Shoeps CMC6/MK4 (cardioid) or MK21 (wide cardioid) to Mid and Shoeps CMC6/MK8 to Side.

Most of my recordings of strings ensemble or choir were made with this technique, sometimes I added close microphones (multimicrophones technique) to capture several instruments.


Other techniques that I use

ORTF technique

acronym of Organisation de Radio et Television Française

Developed by French public television, it’s composed by two matched pair microphones spaced at 17cm each other and angled by 55 degrees. It’s a near coincident technique. DPA microphone about ORTF tecnique.

Less wide than M-S tecnique I like it to record stereo close miking (like acoustic guitar), small vocal ensemble and, generally, when I need to minimize environmental reverberation.

It’s not monocompatible but it still works well.

XY technique

Also this technic has been developed by Alain Blumlein, he used a cardioid (originally eight figure) matched pair microphones angled 90 degrees each other with coincident capsule. It’s a coincident technique. DPA microphone about XY technique.

With a stereo front narrow, XY is the solution for small audio source (like a musical instrument) where it’s important monocompatibility, to attenuate a problematic environmental reverberation and to realize a simple stereo technique.

In this gallery I arrange microphones in ORTF and XY techniques.


Copyright © 2013-2014 by iuatwest. All rights Reserved.
This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://iuatwest.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Logic Pro strikes back

Hi,

another day with Logic Pro and his trouble…

I have still got problems opening logic project, despite I used AIF files…

To get it solved i changed all audiofiles names and I located them after opening the project….

At this point I had not more problems (I couldn’t believe) and I bounced (Logic worked very slow ) the project into stereo file.

Tomorrow I’ll generate (hope so) a different version of the master:

– Hi-End version (96kHz@24bit)

– Video version (48kHz@16bit)

– Cd version (44.1kHz@16bit)

– MP3 version (320kbits stereo)

Just authorized by my customer I’ll link one or more songs of this work.

…and the mix be with you  😉

Lorenzo

Apple Logic in trouble

Hi,

last saturday night I recorded a jazz concert with my mobile station based on Joeco BlackBox BBR1U. Very fine piece of gear, it’s very stable, it has a very good converter and  it records 24 tracks at a time with a sample rate up to 96kHz@24bit.

BBR1U writes the data streaming directly on external hard disk (USB 3.0) in Wave broadcasting format.

Ok, I recorded, now do I have to mix these tracks, right?

Normally my DAW is Apple Logic Pro 9 but by now I verified that it doesn’t work fine with audio files made on BBR1U: problems to open the project and instability done.

This time the problems have increased probably due to high sample rate (96kHz)

Damn, ten minutes to open the project and frequently freeze… I went crazy…

Yesterday, I tried to convert files in AIF format with Weiss Saracon, but no dice… I had the same problems…

Although these problems yesterday I mixed with Logic and the sound was very fine.

Today back in my studio and the project doesn’t started!

I tried to open the project many times, but no dice. I was desperate…

At last I resolved by saving all files in AIF format (one by one) with Logic Sample Editor window and now it work fine!

So, don’t work Logic with Wave broadcasting? Surely I founded many problems.

Note: today I tried with Pro Tools 10 native and with Harrison Mixbus too and they worked fine (but by now I mixed with Logic).

Tomorrow I’ll close mix and I’ll deliver it to my customer.

Have a nice mix ( I hope),

Lorenzo